How to Relax When The World Is Ending

We all face stress regularly in our daily lives. Its effects might manifest when the kids are being rowdy, or when you have an important work presentation to prepare for, or when your relationship with your significant other hits a rough patch. But with the advent of COVID-19, we’re all currently experiencing a totally new stressor that has no known end date and a wide range of ramifications, varying from mildly inconvenient to completely devastating.

When it works the way it’s supposed to, the body’s natural stress response is a good thing. It helps protect us in emergency situations and prepares us to quickly respond to perceived threats. Problems arise, however, when the danger doesn’t dissipate and the body remains on high alert for an extended period of time. Elevated levels of the hormones that increase your heart rate and tense your muscles can negatively impact your health and lead to irritability, anxiety, depression, headaches, and insomnia. [1] You may experience heartburn, panic attacks, high blood sugar, and stomachaches, and your risk of developing chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease can increase. Prolonged tension and anxiety can also lead to destructive behaviors like binge eating or restricting food intake, excessive alcohol consumption, and drug abuse. 

Right now, the last thing you need to be worrying about is how hard it is to stop worrying. Instead, engage in activities that take your mind off of the current situation and encourage relaxation. What works best for someone else might have no positive effect for you, so it might take some practice and experimentation to find the technique that helps you unwind. The tip most often shared by mental health experts is to take slow, deep breaths—but if you’re feeling panicky while you’re wearing a mask and interacting with strangers, deep breaths are probably not going to calm you down in that moment. Instead, you might try clenching and unclenching your fists, imagining a place that makes you feel safe, or concentrating on the sounds around you to center your attention on the present moment.

At home, the relaxation opportunities are endless and as unique as you are. Whether it’s curling up with a good book, whipping up a new recipe in the kitchen, getting your sweat on with a Zoom workout class, catching up with a loved one, trying a new self-care practice, or taking time to meditate, you’ll experience the benefits of stress relief and feel more positive and energized. Your muscles will relax, your blood pressure will normalize, and symptoms like irritability and headaches will subside.

To extend the positive effects of relaxing activity, add some stress-busting supplements to your daily routine. NatureWise offers an impressive lineup of Stress and Memory Support products to nourish your brain and boost your mood. Ashwagandha for Stress helps to balance stress hormones to soothe anxiety and enhance well-being.* Magnesium promotes healthy sleep patterns, nerve function, cardiovascular health.* Vitamin D3, the sunshine vitamin, provides crucial immune support and improves serotonin levels to encourage feelings of positivity and happiness.* And that’s just a sampling!

To help you get through quarantine season without losing your sanity, we’re offering 20% off any Stress and Memory Support supplement through the end of the month (5/31/2020) with code MENTALHEALTH. These are uncertain times, but they don’t have to be miserable when you have solid relaxation practices and mental health-supporting supplements from NatureWise!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


SOURCES

  1.  https://www.healthline.com/health/stress/effects-on-body
  2. https://www.wellandgood.com/good-advice/how-to-support-your-immune-system-natures-way/
  3. https://www.webmd.com/balance/stress-management/stress-symptoms-effects_of-stress-on-the-body
  4. https://www.northshore.org/healthy-you/benefits-of-relaxation/

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